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North Point Marina Beach Safe for Swimming Once More

September 17, 2015

Restoring native plants to a Lake Michigan beach and the dune habitat, gulls stopped frequenting the beach and water quality has been restored.

Northerly Island Success Story

September 16, 2015

Funding from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is restoring a native prairie and marsh ecosystem to Chicago’s Northerly Island in Lake Michigan to provide habitat to native fish and wildlife, and an outdoor recreation space in the city for people.

Burnham Wildlife Corridor

September 15, 2015

Migratory birds and butterflies have a safe place to stop over, thanks to the Burnham Wildlife Corridor. Invasive species have been removed and volunteers have planted thousands of native trees and shrubs in their place.

Calumet Conservation Corps

August 17, 2015

In five sites around the greater Chicago region, a conservation crew has removed invasive plants and weeds, restoring habitat for local wildlife.

Chiwaukee Beach Lake Plain Habitat Restoration

June 30, 2015

Funding from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative has helped Chicago area groups remove invasive species in Chiwaukee so native species can thrive.

Restored Ohio Creek Reduces Flooding

March 3, 2015

A restored creek will reduce flooding near a suburban Cleveland high school. Students at the school helped design and complete the project.

Restoring Local Creek Brings Diverse Communities Together

September 10, 2014

Faculty are improving the Plaster Creek’s water quality and promoting environmental justice through restoration, research, and community education.

Dam Removal Boosts River’s Water Quality and Fish Passage

September 3, 2014

Removing the Nashville Dam in Michigan has improved fish habitat and water quality, increased fish diversity, and provided more recreational opportunities.

New Map Helps Communities Plan their Green Infrastructure Projects

August 27, 2014

The Natural Connections Map of the Lower Grand River Watershed aims to protect the region’s plants, animals, air, water, health, and quality of life.